Summer Previews: Capital Fringe Festival – Something Old, Something New

Ecce - a film by AP Carroll

It’s that time of year again: time to block off a week of your time to theatre. New plays, weird plays, interactive plays, local plays. Running from July 12th through the 29th, there are no fewer than 30 plays being performed each day of the fest.

So how do you possibly decide? Don’t worry, FoBoBlo is here to help you narrow it down to at least one must-see play for those who love both supporting local artists AND love politics.

ECCE is a play that might sound familiar to recent grads and current students at GWU, because it debuted as a 14th Grade Player production in the fall of 2010. That was the same semester that the playwright, AP Carroll, graduated. While young writer often turn to their own lives for material (see: Lena Dunham’s oeuvre). It’s being directed by Ed Churchill.

We sat down with Amanda Rhodes, Ecce’s producer, to learn more about what makes this play an absolute must for this year’s Capital Fringe Fest crowd.

The story is a familiar one — Pontius Pilate was the judge of Jesus’ trial in the Roman province of Judea, and the man who let him be crucified. But the play examines this story from Pilate’s perspective — a politician with ambitions but also the desire to do good in the world.

Rhodes says this play is perfect for a contemporary DC audience — it’s a political thriller set in a timeless story, and it gives audiences a chance to see “the humanity of power players.” The play is for people who want to see “something new set in a familiar story.” The context of the play is especially resonant in DC, and the play “really reflects the city that we live in.”

To find out more, check out the ECCE Capital Fringe Fest pageECCE Facebook Page.

If you’re interested in more productions from former FoBoians, there are at least two!

In This Economy is written and directed by friend-of-the-blog and two-time Jeopardy contestant John Krizel.

- The Webcam Play is written by Tim Guillot and stars Steve Isaac, two GWU other GWU theatre alums.

Both of these plays take a look at love in the modern age — how internet communication is more and more vital in the world we live in, and that includes romance.